‘Cooking Me’ For Dummies


Weekly Writing Challenge: A Pinch of You

This week, we want a window into the complexity that is you. We want the recipe for all the bits and pieces and quirks and foibles and loves that make you you.

This is going to be long, brace yourself.


Although my recipethe medoes has flesh as one of its large number of ingredients, it is vegetarian. So, you can expect to find a  , somewhere on my body, although I’d highly recommend that you don’t go searching for it. I simply can’t seem to make a list of all the ingredients that make the recipe. Even the thought of making such an effort is sucking away all the vitamins from me.

*Suddenly, a magnet enters the creation room*
Oh! No! Stop! Stop! Noooo!!! Not my iron, nooooo!
*Magnet escapes with the loot*
Why me! Why is the world so cruel and unfair!

Low on iron, the recipe was going to end up being tall and skinny, being able to both reach for the high apple in the garden of Eden and being blown away by a quiet breeze right before I pluck it. Darn! Someone added fate without my knowledge and I hardly know what effect it will have on the final recipe. Who was it? Is he the one who sent the magnet? Why? 

Later, by a happy accident, philosophy slipped into the cauldron in which raw good and evil were getting cooked at such high temperatures, the solution looked redder than what lava would look like if it was blushing. Although at first it did seem like a happy accident, I soon realized that it would have been better if it happened, maybe, 10 years later. The cauldron has been on flame for only 17 years, that poor thing exploded after philosophy got mixed into it, it was like a burden from then on. I looked at the world with disbelief, the stark diversity of a man’s actions, swinging from extreme evil to extreme godliness.

I needed to heal my wounds after that explosion, which kind of caused people to discriminate me, like an untouchable, although not in the complete literal sense. To be precise, the explosion made me an introvert. I added analytical and factual reasoning to my reality, the science of deduction, as Sherlock Holmes would call it. I saw people make choices, I saw what led to their choices, what the choices made them.  It all made sense. I saw people abuse power, I saw humble people crumble to dust. I saw a writing on the wall. But I am only 20, it all weighed too much upon me. I needed to vent these fumes of restlessness, rage and realization. I needed another world.

And I then added love, faith, hope and trust. This helped the ticking bomb in me stay dormant. Nature was always a part of the recipe, what fellow humans couldn’t contribute to my recipe, nature did and with love. Although, sometimes, her fury would scare the crap out of every living thing. But hey, she is not angry for no reason, she has us humans to deal with. Just beside this cauldron was a kettle in which a mixture of experiences was being boiled. The kettle started rattling fervently. Gosh! What is wrong now. Maybe I have to get some experiences off my heart. So I took out a cup of the contents from the kettle and poured it into a mold called writing. It conjured interesting shapes and patterns, and that gave a little peace to my mind in midst of such a buzzing ambiance.

Writing gave my recipe a new dimension, and only then did I realize how much I needed it. Even before my recipe(the me) was complete, which is going to take 40-60 years depending on the course of action humans take to counter the growing insensitivity in humans and the global warming triggered by them, I was able to visit new worlds through imagination and other manifestations of the burning need to express. So, I soon kind of learned the craft of multitasking. I faded in and out of all these worlds, all the same trying to continue completing my recipe in this world. But sometimes I am lost in thought, wondering if I have to regret not taking the orthodox path to cooking. The general approach of the youth in this world, that seems to have so much energy and fun in it. But the reasons why I chose the path I am currently on quickly surface back to the fore and I continue stirring. But my recipe would be incomplete, no matter how much mastery I learn, if all coal became ashes, if all the water is evaporated and if all the fire was dead. What am I saying? That I need help. Love. Trust. Faith. Freedom. They make up the air I breathe and in their absence, I move to my end quickly.


If you made it this far, visitor, then I bow to you and thank you.

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When You Win And You Know You Don’t Deserve It


My name was announced and I walked to the center of the floor with a hundred eyes staring at me. The mini-project my teammate and I did, won the best project award at a Project Expo held by our college to inspire the juniors. Quite an undeserving win if you ask me.

I was never satisfied with what I had done regarding the project. I simply learned how the circuit works, I hardly put in any effort in making it work. It was my teammate who did all the work. I was never proud of my contribution, which is almost zero, but nevertheless I do not feel as much guilt for not contributing because I have no proper practical knowledge of electronics even though I studied subjects falling under the same domain for 3 years.

I was guilty for another reason though. Guilty of winning when I did not deserve to. But I just walked to the center of the floor, accepted the certificate and appreciation from the lecturers.

Even with my teammate doing all the main work, we both did not do one thing – the coding part of our project. We got the stuff from the internet and made our project work. We skipped learning a major part of our project. Making us both a bit undeserving of the win. Especially me. (This is my P.O.V. My teammate on the hand does deserve a lot of credit)

I felt sick inside, but there was a wide smile on my face. I kept smiling all through this walking and receiving the appreciation and photographs, while what actually my mind was doing was it tormenting itself thinking about that someone who does deserve all the appreciation, who indeed had all knowledge and idea about the project he/she did, unlike me. How I robbed them off a little joy, a little reward for their hard work. How I, after robbing a worthy one of an opportunity to be happy, don’t even justify the concept of ‘winning’ – that is to enjoy it and find happiness in it. I manage to screw up everything. I rob them and I don’t find a reason to be happy about the loot. Its like I exist only to rob other’s of their little joys, little opportunities at being happy, little rewards that compliment their tiring hard work.

There is nothing that makes me as sick as winning something when I don’t deserve it. And I cannot even properly express it, because I must bear the guilt that is forced onto me. I never even hoped to win that, nor did I want it. And yet, I get it. Along with a big load of guilt and self pity, the add-ons not necessarily part of the package for all the undeserving winners(who don’t dig deep into their conscience).

Anyway, they gave us both a monetary reward. I had no second thoughts about how we shared that money, at least that would give me an opportunity to breathe a little free under the burden of guilt however cheap it may seem. Yeah, cheap. Really, what other word would I use when I am trying to compensate the guilty of robbing a person off their opportunity to win something with mere money! Kind of sounds desperate, doesn’t it.

Well… I am.

P.S: If you notice, there is a pattern for ‘how people who deserve don’t win. how people who don’t deserve to win, do”. It happens more  than you recognize. What scares me about it is not the stat, its the minds.

——

Genetic Mutation In Butterfly Species – Fukushima Disaster


I was going through a science news website and I read this article : Mutant Butterflies are Turning Up in Japan’s Nuclear Disaster Zone. Come back to my blog after reading that, I am only writing my views here and cast your vote in the poll at the end of this article. Its important that we know what we all think when we dealing with a social or environmental cause.

We have been taught in school that after discovering the radioactive material Radium, and winning the Nobel Prize for the discovery, Madam Curie died with aplastic anemia, a disease caused due to long exposure in a highly radioactive environment. It was in 1934 that she died and the extent to which science has penetrated into medicine was not enough to cure her or immediately understand the causes and symptoms. But times have changed and we all have read in our classes how dangerous nuclear and radioactive materials can be. We partly know this because many movies have villains who somehow get hold of nuclear weapons and threaten the world with destruction until some hero gets better of him and saves the world.

We need to be back to reality. After the Fukushima disaster, many countries called for a shutdown of their nuclear facilities and reactors. Many countries in deed have shut down a few of their reactors. Japan, which has some 50(51) reactors, has shut down all of them until recently when they re-started a few nuclear facilities due to the shortage in power generation. Japan has developed rapidly, technology is the very air there. Most of the power that is generated in Japan is through nuclear reactors and hence, it was inevitable that they reopened their reactors.

So anyway, the news that has come in lately about the mutations seen in butterfly species in the Fukushima area is a cause for concern, though it is said otherwise in the article i mentioned above.

You might say, “when even scientists say that it is nothing to worry about, you are just a normal kid and you say they are wrong?”.

One thing first, a permanent genetic change has taken place in some species of butterflies due to carelessness and ‘scientific’ exploitation by humans. We have forced a changed in nature and it is nothing anywhere near to how monkeys evolved into humans. And it is even more alarming to learn that 3 generations of these butterfly species are under mutation, with the mutation rate increasing with each generation. Since a buttefly’s lifecycle is very small, scientists were able to study the extent of mutation in 3 generations of those species.

And we are yet to see how the radiation exposure has effected other living beings(i never said,’humans’. because i am angry that we are putting at risk the future of other beings that we unanimously deemed as ‘lesser’ beings. we are doing it all wrong.)

They used the term ‘abnormalities’ and yet were saying, “nothing to be concerned about”. When you have a fever and you are burning, is it nothing to worry? is it not an abnormality? What does ‘concern’ mean? is it just this apprehensive, phobic nostalgia we get when one of our own gets sick, not other beings? That is mean.

These abnormalities/damages(as called in another report) are : Change in patterns on wings, Unusual shapes of antennas, Changes in eyes, Reduction in wing size.

Let us look at some images that were published in this report: http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/120809/srep00570/full/srep00570.html#/f3

First-voltine collection and abnormalities.

Abnormalities in the adult samples collected in September 2011 and in their F1 offspring.

External and internal exposures.

I just wanted to let people know about the new development,many might have not come across it.

Please comment and react to this new development. What do you think of it? Is it nothing to worry about? Or MUST we be MORE careful from now on?

The Giant Leap Man – Neil Armstrong


Wait till you read the excerpts i put, GRIPPING EVENTS in his life they are.

I don’t remember in which grade I first learned that Neil Armstrong was the first man to land on moon, but I am sure that it was among the first things that I learned about science.

“One small step for man, One giant leap for mankind”, those were his first words when he set his foot upon the moon on 21 July, 1969.

His life, if you go through articles on the internet, has not been simple, it was all extraordinary. He was an American Naval Aviator before he became an astronaut. He was a part of low-bombing aviary fleet of the U.S. Army during the Korean war in 1951. He survived a crash during his duties in the Korean War.

The recounting of the events, as detailed in wikipedia:

“Armstrong first saw action in the Korean War on August 29, 1951, as an escort for a photo reconnaissance plane over Songjin. On September 3, 1951, Armstrong flew armed reconnaissance over the primary transportation and storage facilities south of the village of Majon-ni, west of Wonsan; while he was making a low bombing run at about 350 mph (560 km/h), Armstrong’s F9F Panther was hit by anti-aircraft fire. While trying to regain control, Armstrong collided with a pole at a height of about 20 feet (6.1 m), which sliced off an estimated three feet of the Panther’s right wing.
Armstrong was able to fly the plane back to friendly territory, but due to the loss of the aileron, ejection was his only safe option. He planned to eject over water and await rescue by Navy helicopters, and therefore flew to an airfield near Pohang, but his ejection seat was blown back over land. A jeep driven by a room-mate from flight school picked Armstrong up; it is unknown what happened to the wreckage of No. 125122 F9F-2.
Armstrong flew 78 missions over Korea for a total of 121 hours in the air, most of which were in January 1952. He received the Air Medal for 20 combat missions, a Gold Star for the next 20, and the Korean Service Medal and Engagement Star. Armstrong left the Navy at the age of 22 on August 23, 1952.”

Such was his excellence in flying machines.

And when he eventually became an astronaut and flew to the moon, it was him who took critical decisions while landing on the moon. When Apollo 11’s Lunar Module(LM) was some distance off their actual landing spot, Neil Armstrong changed the Fully Automatic Control of the LM to Manual Control to guide it to the right spot, which you should know is very essential in any space program.

Another excerpt from the Wikipedia page:

The objective of Apollo 11 was to land safely rather than to touch down with precision on a particular spot. Three minutes into the lunar descent burn, Armstrong noted that craters were passing about two seconds too early, which meant the Eagle would probably touch down beyond the planned landing zone by several miles.

When Armstrong noticed they were heading towards a landing area which he believed was unsafe, he took over manual control of the LM, and attempted to find an area which seemed safer, taking longer than expected, and longer than most simulations had taken.[68] For this reason, there was concern from mission control that the LM was running low on fuel. Upon landing, Aldrin and Armstrong believed they had about 40 seconds worth of fuel left, including the 20 seconds worth of fuel which had to be saved in the event of an abort. During training, Armstrong had landed the LLTV with less than 15 seconds left on several occasions, and he was also confident the LM could survive a straight-down fall from 50 feet (15 m) if needed. Analysis after the mission showed that at touchdown there were 45 to 50 seconds of propellant burn time left.
The landing on the surface of the moon occurred at 20:17:39 UTC on July 20, 1969. When a sensor attached to the legs of the still hovering Lunar Module made lunar contact, a panel light inside the LM lit up and Aldrin called out, “Contact light.” As the LM settled on the surface Aldrin then said, “Okay. Engine stop,” and Armstrong said, “Shutdown.” The first words Armstrong intentionally spoke to Mission Control and the world from the lunar surface were, “Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.” Aldrin and Armstrong celebrated with a brisk handshake and pat on the back before quickly returning to the checklist of tasks needed to ready the lunar module for liftoff from the Moon should an emergency unfold during the first moments on the lunar surface. During the critical landing, the only message from Houston was “30 seconds”, meaning the amount of fuel left. When Armstrong had confirmed touch-down, Houston expressed their worries during the manual landing as “You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We’re breathing again”.

And you know what he said when he set his foot upon the moon.

And when all was done, when they were ready to be back to earth, for the eventual pompous welcome from millions across the globe, this happened(source: wikipedia):

After they re-entered the LM, the hatch was closed and sealed. While preparing for the liftoff from the lunar surface, Armstrong and Aldrin discovered that, in their bulky spacesuits, they had broken the ignition switch for the ascent engine; using part of a pen, they pushed the circuit breaker in to activate the launch sequence, and Aldrin still possesses the pen which they used to do this. The lunar module then continued to its rendezvous and docked with Columbia, the command and service module. The three astronauts returned to Earth and splashed down in the Pacific ocean, to be picked up by the USS Hornet (CV-12).

On 25 August, 2012, the GIANT LEAP MAN took another big leap, a leap that will not see him return again.

Neil Armstrong.